How Alcohol Might Impact Your Recovery. @WomensRunning






Women’s Running

@WomensRunning

·


There’s a good chance that post-run beer is affecting your ability to recover from even an average run.

How Alcohol Might Impact Your Recovery

July 22, 2021 David Roche

While the literature on alcohol and athletic performance is somewhat mixed, it’s worth tracking how you respond to even small amounts due to the risk of impaired recovery.

A few months ago on our podcast, my co-host (what other cultures call a “wife”), Megan, mentioned how she started using a WHOOP heart-rate-tracking strap because of the Journal feature. The Journal lets users log life events, tracking how the body responds over time. Megan was interested in tracking one category of activities in particular. But I’ll let you listen to the podcast to find out because this article is rated PG (may contain graphic podcast promotion).

WHOOP heard the episode and eventually signed on as a formal sponsor (promo code “SWAP” for 15% off! Selling out never felt so life-affirming!). Many of our athletes got WHOOP straps, letting us track recovery patterns over time. Some training logs became unofficial Journals, with athletes reporting added data each day. And something jumped out pretty quickly. Those unexplained drops in recovery that would occasionally pop up?

Often, it was the day after an athlete drank alcohol.

We weren’t just seeing spurious patterns. An article by WHOOP states: “of all the behaviors available to record in the WHOOP Journal, drinking alcohol is the one with the single greatest negative impact on next-day recovery.” They even recorded a podcast on elite performers sharing stories of alcohol’s impact on their bodies.

Back in 2019, I wrote an article on the uncertain, individual-specific science of alcohol and athletic performance. One of the big uncertainties was related to how alcohol consumption may affect longer-term athletic trajectories based on changes to recovery and adaptation. That article reviewed some possible impacts to sleep, the immune system, endocrine system, and metabolic processes, with no satisfying conclusion. These heart-rate-tracking apps could theoretically integrate many of the uncertain variables into a global recovery analysis. What might that heart-rate analysis add to the discussion?  Let’s dig into some of the science.

RELATED: A Nutritionist Shares What a Month of No Alcohol Did to His Body

Heart Rate Variability (HRV)

WHOOP, Oura Ring, and other tracking tools often look at similar metrics. While wrist-based straps are less accurate than chest straps at measuring heart rate during intense running, they are reliable at rest. Resting heart rate provides insight into recovery status because it increases in periods of higher stress. That’s the horse-and-buggy, old-school data. HRV is the new hotness.

HRV measures the gap between heartbeats. As stated by a 2017 article in the Frontiers in Public Health journal, “a healthy heart is not a metronome.” The autonomic nervous system controls involuntary behaviors, like heartbeats or our unquenchable attraction to Timothée Chalamet. The parasympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system responds to information from internal organs (“rest and digest”). The sympathetic branch responds to stress (“fight or flight”). When the nervous system is overloaded, HRV goes down as the heart essentially goes on autopilot, less receptive to nervous system signals.

2018 review article in the journal Psychiatry Investigations found that HRV correlates with stress, validating its use as one data point to inform stress management practices. There are tons of cool studies of how it can be used in practice (though the jury is still out on its universal effectiveness for athletes). For example, a 2018 study in the European Journal of Applied Physiology monitored the HRV of 24 elite skiers in a high-altitude training camp. In the experimental group, if HRV dropped too much (30%+) or too long (multiple days) relative to an individual baseline, athletes reduced training; if it increased or stayed the same, they would increase training. Training using shifts in HRV as a general guideline led to fitness increases, along with improved HRV.

While HRV is just one data point to inform training, recovery, and adaptation, it provides helpful clues into what stress we are handling, and what stress we aren’t. Hard training days can reduce HRV for some athletes. For example, I have a moderately low baseline of 70 (I don’t think I’ve remembered to breathe while writing the last 2 paragraphs, so it makes sense). The first time I did a long bike with Megan this season, it dropped to 51, around the 30% threshold in the 2018 study. Normal life stress also reduces HRV. My lowest reading yet was 41, the day after a short recovery jog, but when I heard tough news for a loved one. Care Bears wish they could care as hard as I do. Care swag.

And alcohol works similarly for my body. For me, it’s approximately a hard workout, even in relatively small quantities. Megan responded similarly. So did some athletes on the team. Is it signal, or is it noise? Confounding variables that make alcohol a passenger on the stress train (i.e. maybe people drink in more stressful situations), or is alcohol a stress conductor?

How Alcohol Might Impact Your Recovery. @WomensRunning






Women’s Running

@WomensRunning

·


There’s a good chance that post-run beer is affecting your ability to recover from even an average run.

How Alcohol Might Impact Your Recovery

July 22, 2021 David Roche

While the literature on alcohol and athletic performance is somewhat mixed, it’s worth tracking how you respond to even small amounts due to the risk of impaired recovery.

A few months ago on our podcast, my co-host (what other cultures call a “wife”), Megan, mentioned how she started using a WHOOP heart-rate-tracking strap because of the Journal feature. The Journal lets users log life events, tracking how the body responds over time. Megan was interested in tracking one category of activities in particular. But I’ll let you listen to the podcast to find out because this article is rated PG (may contain graphic podcast promotion).

WHOOP heard the episode and eventually signed on as a formal sponsor (promo code “SWAP” for 15% off! Selling out never felt so life-affirming!). Many of our athletes got WHOOP straps, letting us track recovery patterns over time. Some training logs became unofficial Journals, with athletes reporting added data each day. And something jumped out pretty quickly. Those unexplained drops in recovery that would occasionally pop up?

Often, it was the day after an athlete drank alcohol.

We weren’t just seeing spurious patterns. An article by WHOOP states: “of all the behaviors available to record in the WHOOP Journal, drinking alcohol is the one with the single greatest negative impact on next-day recovery.” They even recorded a podcast on elite performers sharing stories of alcohol’s impact on their bodies.

Back in 2019, I wrote an article on the uncertain, individual-specific science of alcohol and athletic performance. One of the big uncertainties was related to how alcohol consumption may affect longer-term athletic trajectories based on changes to recovery and adaptation. That article reviewed some possible impacts to sleep, the immune system, endocrine system, and metabolic processes, with no satisfying conclusion. These heart-rate-tracking apps could theoretically integrate many of the uncertain variables into a global recovery analysis. What might that heart-rate analysis add to the discussion?  Let’s dig into some of the science.

RELATED: A Nutritionist Shares What a Month of No Alcohol Did to His Body

Heart Rate Variability (HRV)

WHOOP, Oura Ring, and other tracking tools often look at similar metrics. While wrist-based straps are less accurate than chest straps at measuring heart rate during intense running, they are reliable at rest. Resting heart rate provides insight into recovery status because it increases in periods of higher stress. That’s the horse-and-buggy, old-school data. HRV is the new hotness.

HRV measures the gap between heartbeats. As stated by a 2017 article in the Frontiers in Public Health journal, “a healthy heart is not a metronome.” The autonomic nervous system controls involuntary behaviors, like heartbeats or our unquenchable attraction to Timothée Chalamet. The parasympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system responds to information from internal organs (“rest and digest”). The sympathetic branch responds to stress (“fight or flight”). When the nervous system is overloaded, HRV goes down as the heart essentially goes on autopilot, less receptive to nervous system signals.

2018 review article in the journal Psychiatry Investigations found that HRV correlates with stress, validating its use as one data point to inform stress management practices. There are tons of cool studies of how it can be used in practice (though the jury is still out on its universal effectiveness for athletes). For example, a 2018 study in the European Journal of Applied Physiology monitored the HRV of 24 elite skiers in a high-altitude training camp. In the experimental group, if HRV dropped too much (30%+) or too long (multiple days) relative to an individual baseline, athletes reduced training; if it increased or stayed the same, they would increase training. Training using shifts in HRV as a general guideline led to fitness increases, along with improved HRV.

While HRV is just one data point to inform training, recovery, and adaptation, it provides helpful clues into what stress we are handling, and what stress we aren’t. Hard training days can reduce HRV for some athletes. For example, I have a moderately low baseline of 70 (I don’t think I’ve remembered to breathe while writing the last 2 paragraphs, so it makes sense). The first time I did a long bike with Megan this season, it dropped to 51, around the 30% threshold in the 2018 study. Normal life stress also reduces HRV. My lowest reading yet was 41, the day after a short recovery jog, but when I heard tough news for a loved one. Care Bears wish they could care as hard as I do. Care swag.

And alcohol works similarly for my body. For me, it’s approximately a hard workout, even in relatively small quantities. Megan responded similarly. So did some athletes on the team. Is it signal, or is it noise? Confounding variables that make alcohol a passenger on the stress train (i.e. maybe people drink in more stressful situations), or is alcohol a stress conductor?

How Alcohol Might Impact Your Recovery. @WomensRunning






Women’s Running

@WomensRunning

·


There’s a good chance that post-run beer is affecting your ability to recover from even an average run.

How Alcohol Might Impact Your Recovery

July 22, 2021 David Roche

While the literature on alcohol and athletic performance is somewhat mixed, it’s worth tracking how you respond to even small amounts due to the risk of impaired recovery.

A few months ago on our podcast, my co-host (what other cultures call a “wife”), Megan, mentioned how she started using a WHOOP heart-rate-tracking strap because of the Journal feature. The Journal lets users log life events, tracking how the body responds over time. Megan was interested in tracking one category of activities in particular. But I’ll let you listen to the podcast to find out because this article is rated PG (may contain graphic podcast promotion).

WHOOP heard the episode and eventually signed on as a formal sponsor (promo code “SWAP” for 15% off! Selling out never felt so life-affirming!). Many of our athletes got WHOOP straps, letting us track recovery patterns over time. Some training logs became unofficial Journals, with athletes reporting added data each day. And something jumped out pretty quickly. Those unexplained drops in recovery that would occasionally pop up?

Often, it was the day after an athlete drank alcohol.

We weren’t just seeing spurious patterns. An article by WHOOP states: “of all the behaviors available to record in the WHOOP Journal, drinking alcohol is the one with the single greatest negative impact on next-day recovery.” They even recorded a podcast on elite performers sharing stories of alcohol’s impact on their bodies.

Back in 2019, I wrote an article on the uncertain, individual-specific science of alcohol and athletic performance. One of the big uncertainties was related to how alcohol consumption may affect longer-term athletic trajectories based on changes to recovery and adaptation. That article reviewed some possible impacts to sleep, the immune system, endocrine system, and metabolic processes, with no satisfying conclusion. These heart-rate-tracking apps could theoretically integrate many of the uncertain variables into a global recovery analysis. What might that heart-rate analysis add to the discussion?  Let’s dig into some of the science.

RELATED: A Nutritionist Shares What a Month of No Alcohol Did to His Body

Heart Rate Variability (HRV)

WHOOP, Oura Ring, and other tracking tools often look at similar metrics. While wrist-based straps are less accurate than chest straps at measuring heart rate during intense running, they are reliable at rest. Resting heart rate provides insight into recovery status because it increases in periods of higher stress. That’s the horse-and-buggy, old-school data. HRV is the new hotness.

HRV measures the gap between heartbeats. As stated by a 2017 article in the Frontiers in Public Health journal, “a healthy heart is not a metronome.” The autonomic nervous system controls involuntary behaviors, like heartbeats or our unquenchable attraction to Timothée Chalamet. The parasympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system responds to information from internal organs (“rest and digest”). The sympathetic branch responds to stress (“fight or flight”). When the nervous system is overloaded, HRV goes down as the heart essentially goes on autopilot, less receptive to nervous system signals.

2018 review article in the journal Psychiatry Investigations found that HRV correlates with stress, validating its use as one data point to inform stress management practices. There are tons of cool studies of how it can be used in practice (though the jury is still out on its universal effectiveness for athletes). For example, a 2018 study in the European Journal of Applied Physiology monitored the HRV of 24 elite skiers in a high-altitude training camp. In the experimental group, if HRV dropped too much (30%+) or too long (multiple days) relative to an individual baseline, athletes reduced training; if it increased or stayed the same, they would increase training. Training using shifts in HRV as a general guideline led to fitness increases, along with improved HRV.

While HRV is just one data point to inform training, recovery, and adaptation, it provides helpful clues into what stress we are handling, and what stress we aren’t. Hard training days can reduce HRV for some athletes. For example, I have a moderately low baseline of 70 (I don’t think I’ve remembered to breathe while writing the last 2 paragraphs, so it makes sense). The first time I did a long bike with Megan this season, it dropped to 51, around the 30% threshold in the 2018 study. Normal life stress also reduces HRV. My lowest reading yet was 41, the day after a short recovery jog, but when I heard tough news for a loved one. Care Bears wish they could care as hard as I do. Care swag.

And alcohol works similarly for my body. For me, it’s approximately a hard workout, even in relatively small quantities. Megan responded similarly. So did some athletes on the team. Is it signal, or is it noise? Confounding variables that make alcohol a passenger on the stress train (i.e. maybe people drink in more stressful situations), or is alcohol a stress conductor?

Alcohol slows muscle growth by 15 to 20%.

“I don’t get it — I go to the gym every day.”

“But I watch what I eat!”

Do these phrases sound familiar? Are you working on a healthier body, and does it seem like you just can’t make all the pieces fit together?

Bad news, boozers: Alcohol linked to seven deadly cancers

There might be a factor sabotaging your workout and your health that you’ve never even considered.

With magazines, newspapers and the media constantly touting alcohol’s health benefits, it’s easy to overlook the havoc that it can wreak on your body.

When it comes to losing weight, counting calories or keeping your body performing at its peak, alcohol isn’t doing you any favors.

Alcohol leads to poor dietary habits

How to get the best deal possible when buying a brand new home

Alcohol contributes to poor dietary habits in a multitude of ways. The empty calories you’re drinking can completely derail the calorie count you’re trying to adhere to. Two or three beers can top out at over 500 calories. A Long Island Ice Tea has over 780 calories in it.

Studies have also shown that drinking at mealtimes is associated with insufficient intake of healthy foods, such as fruits and vegetables, and with excessive intake of animal protein.

Those appetizers you’re munching alongside your happy hour drinks have already negated your workout from this morning.

Now add in the greasy spoon breakfast you’re going to consume in the morning to deal with the inevitable hangover, and you can see why alcohol is not exactly a diet buddy.

Alcohol steals your energy

Alcohol disrupts your sleeping patterns and causes fatigue and dehydration. Combine those three factors, and you’ll find yourself skipping the gym on Thursday morning after Wine Down Wednesday.

That fatigue is going to last through the day, so you’ll probably be dragging after work, too. It’s easy to bypass your Zumba class for the couch and a bag of chips instead.

Add up the damage that you’ve just created from the combination of empty calories, lack of exercise, poor food choices and a slowed metabolism from the alcohol, and you can easily see why those 10 pounds just keep sticking to you.

Alcohol breaks down muscles

The most profound impact that alcohol has on your workout and your body is in your muscles themselves. You build muscle through protein synthesis. A study by Penn State showed that alcohol slows muscle growth by 15 to 20%.

Alcohol is also a hormone disruptor. It lowers testosterone levels while increasing estrogen. Testosterone is the single most important muscle-building hormone in your body. How much muscle a person can gain is dependent upon their level of free-flowing testosterone.

Basically every drinking day negates an entire workout when it comes to building muscles. Also, remember that alcohol slows reaction time and your ability to create glucose for energy. It robs your body of nutrients and carbohydrates.

You might as well just cancel that gym membership.

Alcohol increases fat storage

Alcohol has a huge ego. When you drink, alcohol more or less takes over and demands that it be processed first. So, everything else that you’ve consumed is put on hold. Alcohol becomes the first fuel your body will use, but it lacks any nutrients or minerals.

To top it off, while alcohol is being metabolized, your body won’t burn any fat. Since alcohol is mainly sugar, the only thing your body can convert it to is fat.

By drinking, you’re basically compounding the problem, putting the brakes on burning any fat your body has stored and adding to it with the alcohol you’ve consumed. Your Long Island Ice Tea just turned into a double!

Alcohol might be touted by the media for its health benefits, but if you take a long, hard look at elite athletes, trainers and nutritionists, you’ll quickly find that the majority of them abstain from alcohol use.

If you’re truly dedicated to staying healthy and improving your body through diet and exercise, then go ahead and skip happy hour at the bar.

Hit up a smoothie bar instead. You can fuel up with the energy you need for your work out. Rather than consuming empty calories, your body can use the nutrients and minerals to fortify your hard work.

You’ll also sleep better and wake up refreshed so you can stick to your plan, shave seconds off your running time, or conquer a new goal at Crossfit.

Whatever your workout goal is, going alcohol free will get you there sooner and healthier!

Annie Grace is the author of “This Naked Mind: Control Alcohol, Find Freedom, Discover Happiness & Change Your Life.” Learn more at thisnakedmind.com. Connect with Annie on Twitter.com and Facebook.com.

How Alcohol Might Impact Your Recovery. @WomensRunning






Women’s Running

@WomensRunning

·


There’s a good chance that post-run beer is affecting your ability to recover from even an average run.

How Alcohol Might Impact Your Recovery

July 22, 2021 David Roche

While the literature on alcohol and athletic performance is somewhat mixed, it’s worth tracking how you respond to even small amounts due to the risk of impaired recovery.

A few months ago on our podcast, my co-host (what other cultures call a “wife”), Megan, mentioned how she started using a WHOOP heart-rate-tracking strap because of the Journal feature. The Journal lets users log life events, tracking how the body responds over time. Megan was interested in tracking one category of activities in particular. But I’ll let you listen to the podcast to find out because this article is rated PG (may contain graphic podcast promotion).

WHOOP heard the episode and eventually signed on as a formal sponsor (promo code “SWAP” for 15% off! Selling out never felt so life-affirming!). Many of our athletes got WHOOP straps, letting us track recovery patterns over time. Some training logs became unofficial Journals, with athletes reporting added data each day. And something jumped out pretty quickly. Those unexplained drops in recovery that would occasionally pop up?

Often, it was the day after an athlete drank alcohol.

We weren’t just seeing spurious patterns. An article by WHOOP states: “of all the behaviors available to record in the WHOOP Journal, drinking alcohol is the one with the single greatest negative impact on next-day recovery.” They even recorded a podcast on elite performers sharing stories of alcohol’s impact on their bodies.

Back in 2019, I wrote an article on the uncertain, individual-specific science of alcohol and athletic performance. One of the big uncertainties was related to how alcohol consumption may affect longer-term athletic trajectories based on changes to recovery and adaptation. That article reviewed some possible impacts to sleep, the immune system, endocrine system, and metabolic processes, with no satisfying conclusion. These heart-rate-tracking apps could theoretically integrate many of the uncertain variables into a global recovery analysis. What might that heart-rate analysis add to the discussion?  Let’s dig into some of the science.

RELATED: A Nutritionist Shares What a Month of No Alcohol Did to His Body

Heart Rate Variability (HRV)

WHOOP, Oura Ring, and other tracking tools often look at similar metrics. While wrist-based straps are less accurate than chest straps at measuring heart rate during intense running, they are reliable at rest. Resting heart rate provides insight into recovery status because it increases in periods of higher stress. That’s the horse-and-buggy, old-school data. HRV is the new hotness.

HRV measures the gap between heartbeats. As stated by a 2017 article in the Frontiers in Public Health journal, “a healthy heart is not a metronome.” The autonomic nervous system controls involuntary behaviors, like heartbeats or our unquenchable attraction to Timothée Chalamet. The parasympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system responds to information from internal organs (“rest and digest”). The sympathetic branch responds to stress (“fight or flight”). When the nervous system is overloaded, HRV goes down as the heart essentially goes on autopilot, less receptive to nervous system signals.

2018 review article in the journal Psychiatry Investigations found that HRV correlates with stress, validating its use as one data point to inform stress management practices. There are tons of cool studies of how it can be used in practice (though the jury is still out on its universal effectiveness for athletes). For example, a 2018 study in the European Journal of Applied Physiology monitored the HRV of 24 elite skiers in a high-altitude training camp. In the experimental group, if HRV dropped too much (30%+) or too long (multiple days) relative to an individual baseline, athletes reduced training; if it increased or stayed the same, they would increase training. Training using shifts in HRV as a general guideline led to fitness increases, along with improved HRV.

While HRV is just one data point to inform training, recovery, and adaptation, it provides helpful clues into what stress we are handling, and what stress we aren’t. Hard training days can reduce HRV for some athletes. For example, I have a moderately low baseline of 70 (I don’t think I’ve remembered to breathe while writing the last 2 paragraphs, so it makes sense). The first time I did a long bike with Megan this season, it dropped to 51, around the 30% threshold in the 2018 study. Normal life stress also reduces HRV. My lowest reading yet was 41, the day after a short recovery jog, but when I heard tough news for a loved one. Care Bears wish they could care as hard as I do. Care swag.

And alcohol works similarly for my body. For me, it’s approximately a hard workout, even in relatively small quantities. Megan responded similarly. So did some athletes on the team. Is it signal, or is it noise? Confounding variables that make alcohol a passenger on the stress train (i.e. maybe people drink in more stressful situations), or is alcohol a stress conductor?

Alcohol just full of empty calories.

“I don’t get it — I go to the gym every day.”

“But I watch what I eat!”

Do these phrases sound familiar? Are you working on a healthier body, and does it seem like you just can’t make all the pieces fit together?

Bad news, boozers: Alcohol linked to seven deadly cancers

There might be a factor sabotaging your workout and your health that you’ve never even considered.

With magazines, newspapers and the media constantly touting alcohol’s health benefits, it’s easy to overlook the havoc that it can wreak on your body.

When it comes to losing weight, counting calories or keeping your body performing at its peak, alcohol isn’t doing you any favors.

Alcohol leads to poor dietary habits

How to get the best deal possible when buying a brand new home

Alcohol contributes to poor dietary habits in a multitude of ways. The empty calories you’re drinking can completely derail the calorie count you’re trying to adhere to. Two or three beers can top out at over 500 calories. A Long Island Ice Tea has over 780 calories in it.

Studies have also shown that drinking at mealtimes is associated with insufficient intake of healthy foods, such as fruits and vegetables, and with excessive intake of animal protein.

Those appetizers you’re munching alongside your happy hour drinks have already negated your workout from this morning.

Now add in the greasy spoon breakfast you’re going to consume in the morning to deal with the inevitable hangover, and you can see why alcohol is not exactly a diet buddy.

Zika risk is ‘low’ in NYC — but take these precautions, doc says

Alcohol steals your energy

Alcohol disrupts your sleeping patterns and causes fatigue and dehydration. Combine those three factors, and you’ll find yourself skipping the gym on Thursday morning after Wine Down Wednesday.

That fatigue is going to last through the day, so you’ll probably be dragging after work, too. It’s easy to bypass your Zumba class for the couch and a bag of chips instead.

Add up the damage that you’ve just created from the combination of empty calories, lack of exercise, poor food choices and a slowed metabolism from the alcohol, and you can easily see why those 10 pounds just keep sticking to you.

With data breaches common, keep on top of your credit report

Alcohol breaks down muscles

The most profound impact that alcohol has on your workout and your body is in your muscles themselves. You build muscle through protein synthesis. A study by Penn State showed that alcohol slows muscle growth by 15 to 20%.

Alcohol is also a hormone disruptor. It lowers testosterone levels while increasing estrogen. Testosterone is the single most important muscle-building hormone in your body. How much muscle a person can gain is dependent upon their level of free-flowing testosterone.

Basically every drinking day negates an entire workout when it comes to building muscles. Also, remember that alcohol slows reaction time and your ability to create glucose for energy. It robs your body of nutrients and carbohydrates.

You might as well just cancel that gym membership.

Alcohol increases fat storage

Alcohol has a huge ego. When you drink, alcohol more or less takes over and demands that it be processed first. So, everything else that you’ve consumed is put on hold. Alcohol becomes the first fuel your body will use, but it lacks any nutrients or minerals.

To top it off, while alcohol is being metabolized, your body won’t burn any fat. Since alcohol is mainly sugar, the only thing your body can convert it to is fat.

By drinking, you’re basically compounding the problem, putting the brakes on burning any fat your body has stored and adding to it with the alcohol you’ve consumed. Your Long Island Ice Tea just turned into a double!

Alcohol might be touted by the media for its health benefits, but if you take a long, hard look at elite athletes, trainers and nutritionists, you’ll quickly find that the majority of them abstain from alcohol use.

If you’re truly dedicated to staying healthy and improving your body through diet and exercise, then go ahead and skip happy hour at the bar.

Hit up a smoothie bar instead. You can fuel up with the energy you need for your work out. Rather than consuming empty calories, your body can use the nutrients and minerals to fortify your hard work.

You’ll also sleep better and wake up refreshed so you can stick to your plan, shave seconds off your running time, or conquer a new goal at Crossfit.

Whatever your workout goal is, going alcohol free will get you there sooner and healthier!

Annie Grace is the author of “This Naked Mind: Control Alcohol, Find Freedom, Discover Happiness & Change Your Life.” Learn more at thisnakedmind.com. Connect with Annie on Twitter.com and Facebook.com.