When was the last time you took full rest day.?

Rest Days are Key to Staying Healthy

Planning a full rest day into your routine can actually make you a better runner. Here’s how it works.

August 26, 2020Amanda Smith


Whether training for your next marathon or your first 5K, there is something crucial that can sometimes be neglected by women with a lot of ambition—rest (especially in the form of one full rest day).

When rest is neglected, training suffers. Adequate rest and nutrition throughout any training process are the best ways to ensure not only performance, but overall good health and injury prevention. According to the 2020 National Runner Survey, half of all respondents had an injury that kept them from running for four or more days in the last 12 months.

Fitting in rest days are crucial to keeping your body going in the long run. “It’s extra time to allow for all the, essentially, mechanical repair to go on in the body; production of collagen to repair tendons, muscles, bones, all those tissues taking some breakdown in normal exercise,” says Robert Wayner, PT, DPT, and director of the Ohio Center for Running Performance. A rest day also allows the body to build energy stores back up. “We know that our athletes, over a six-day training period, they may start the week off with full tanks and really good energy balance. But as the week wears on then, especially since some of their workouts are more demanding than others, those more demanding ones are going to take a longer period of time to essentially recoup from caloric energy-wise,” he says. One consequence of continually skipping the rest day and not allowing energy stores to build back up is developing Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport (RED-S) that Wayner says he sees runners fall into inadvertently.

A lot of runners feel guilt around taking a rest day, which comes as a result of a society that glorifies productivity and hyper-competitiveness. Those feelings are especially felt by women who try to ‘do it all.’ The reality is that you cannot train to your full potential if you never let off the gas. Eventually something will break down. For that reason, a group of runners created an Instagram account dedicated solely to idealizing rest where they show how runners like Colleen Quigley, Amelia Boone, or Molly Seidel spend their rest days.

Women’s Running@WomensRunning

6 Surprising Ways the Mediterranean Diet Benefits Your Body

You know it’s great for your heart—but your favorite Mediterranean staples do wonders for other parts of your body, too.

Tuesday, January 2, 2018, 8:31 am
The Mediterranean diet gets hyped for a reason. The traditional Italian, Greek, or Spanish way of eating can help you lose weight, slash your cancer risk, and offers your whole body a slew of health perks.Mediterranean meals—which range even farther to France, Croatia, and Turkey—are mainly composed of plant-based foods, with the occasional addition of lean proteins like fish and chicken, according to the U.S. National Library of Medicine. Other options include foods high in fiber, like whole grains, fruits, and vegetables. Healthy fats, like the kind you find in olive oil and nuts, are also a staple. If you drink, red wine will be your libation of choice, while red meats, butter, and added sugar are typically limited.(Looking for nutritious meals to fuel your run? Try the Runner’s World Cookbook.)

Overall, it’s one of the healthiest ways to eat, because you’re primarily consuming foods in their whole form, explains Carolyn Brown, M.S., R.D., a nutrition counselor at Foodtrainers in New York City.

In general, Americans tend to eat fewer fruits, vegetables, and healthy fats, while loading up on more processed carbs and sugar. The result? A higher risk of obesity, heart problems, and diabetes, says Brown.

But eating an abundance of Mediterranean staples? That can do your body good. Read on to find out how.

https://www.runnersworld.com/nutrition/mediterranean-diet-benefits-entire-body/slide/1

Anti-Inflammatory Golden Goji Latte @Yoga_Journal

Quick & Easy Microwaveable Porridge Oats

odl micro porr feb 16

When was the last time you took full rest day.?

Rest Days are Key to Staying Healthy

Planning a full rest day into your routine can actually make you a better runner. Here’s how it works.

August 26, 2020Amanda Smith


Whether training for your next marathon or your first 5K, there is something crucial that can sometimes be neglected by women with a lot of ambition—rest (especially in the form of one full rest day).

When rest is neglected, training suffers. Adequate rest and nutrition throughout any training process are the best ways to ensure not only performance, but overall good health and injury prevention. According to the 2020 National Runner Survey, half of all respondents had an injury that kept them from running for four or more days in the last 12 months.

Fitting in rest days are crucial to keeping your body going in the long run. “It’s extra time to allow for all the, essentially, mechanical repair to go on in the body; production of collagen to repair tendons, muscles, bones, all those tissues taking some breakdown in normal exercise,” says Robert Wayner, PT, DPT, and director of the Ohio Center for Running Performance. A rest day also allows the body to build energy stores back up. “We know that our athletes, over a six-day training period, they may start the week off with full tanks and really good energy balance. But as the week wears on then, especially since some of their workouts are more demanding than others, those more demanding ones are going to take a longer period of time to essentially recoup from caloric energy-wise,” he says. One consequence of continually skipping the rest day and not allowing energy stores to build back up is developing Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport (RED-S) that Wayner says he sees runners fall into inadvertently.

A lot of runners feel guilt around taking a rest day, which comes as a result of a society that glorifies productivity and hyper-competitiveness. Those feelings are especially felt by women who try to ‘do it all.’ The reality is that you cannot train to your full potential if you never let off the gas. Eventually something will break down. For that reason, a group of runners created an Instagram account dedicated solely to idealizing rest where they show how runners like Colleen Quigley, Amelia Boone, or Molly Seidel spend their rest days.

Women’s Running@WomensRunning

Recipe: Charred Broccoli Tabbouleh Salad

Charred-Broccoli-Tabbouleh-scaled

Try this delightful twist on traditional tabbouleh. Blend nutritious, high fiber bulgur with charred broccoli, chickpeas and tahini. You’ll get bone-building vitamin K, and vegetarian-friendly protein. And you’ll also get great taste.

Ingredients

¼ cup bulgur wheat
1 broccoli crown
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
¼ plus ⅛ teaspoon kosher salt
¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
½ English cucumber, cut into small pieces
1 cup grape tomatoes, quartered
2 scallions (white and light green parts), thinly sliced
15.5-ounce can (no salt added) chickpeas, drained and rinsed
3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
1 tablespoon tahini*, well stirred

Directions

  1. Put the bulgur into a small bowl and cover with hot water by 2 inches. Let stand until the bulgur is tender, about 30 minutes. Drain into a strainer and shake out excess water.
  2. Heat the oven to 425°F.
  3. Cut the broccoli into small florets and place on a rimmed sheet pan. Drizzle with the oil and sprinkle with ¼ teaspoon of the salt and pepper. Toss and spread into a single layer. Roast until tender and charred at the edges, 12 to 15 minutes. Let cool.
  4. In a large bowl, combine the cucumber, tomatoes, scallions, chickpeas, bulgur, and broccoli.
  5. In a small bowl, whisk together the lemon juice, tahini, and remaining ⅛ teaspoon salt. Pour over the salad and toss well to combine.

Nutritional information

Calories 251

Total fat 10g
Saturated fat 1.5g
Protein 11g
Carbohydrate 33g
Dietary fiber 7g
Sugar 4.6g
Added sugar 0g
Cholesterol 0mg
Sodium 452mg

Recipe developed by cookbook author Sara Quessenberry for Cleveland Clinic Wellness

 

Quick & Easy Microwaveable Porridge Oats

odl micro porr feb 16